How To Overcome Operational Bottlenecks In Your Hospital

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My company, Cobblestones Consulting, provides non-clinical services and solutions to healthcare organizations in India. As management consultants, we partner with our clients, on fixed-term engagements, to ensure their people, I.T tools and processes help them achieve patient-centric operations and profit maximization.

One of our clients is a large +500 bedded multi-specialty hospital in Western India which operates in collaboration with the government in Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode. In addition to being a tertiary care teaching organisation that has all the important specialties, the hospital also conducts rural community health & training programs. It also serves as a research center for clinical trials, social sciences and operational research.

Public perception of this hospital was largely positive. It was seen as an effective provider of rational, affordable and comprehensive healthcare. However, in recent times, the hospital was in the news for all the wrong reasons.

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The Challenge

The hospital was accused of not honoring its mandate to provide 33% of its beds free of charge to the poor and indigent, of having poorly maintained and at times, dangerous infrastructure, staff that was ill-trained and rude,  poor financial planning and excessive bureaucratization.

This negative publicity was influencing patient perceptions across the continuum of care, to the detriment of the hospital. Patient inflow reduced and the hospital began bleeding profits at an alarming rate.

The role of the Operations Team in this hospital was to streamline administrative as well as non-clinical operational process flows, in an effort to “render quality service at low-cost”. They were responsible for everything from surgical schedules, patient flow through the emergency department, coordination with community emergency services,  coordination with the various wings, wards and departments within the hospital, assessing the capacity of beds, staff, and equipment to satisfy random patient demand, and all necessary logistics.

The Operations Team in this hospital first sought to find out the severity of the issue. Then, they tried to frame methods to approach the problems and to figure out the obstacles. This was obviously not working out for them. With each passing day, negative patient experience in the hospital was causing fewer and fewer admissions & greater patient exodus to the competition. As is to be expected, the Board of Directors at the hospital gave more importance & focus to the solving of clinical issues by the medical departments, which only made the task of the Operations Team more difficult.

In this light, the hospital sought external expertise to find a stable and feasible solution for the current non-clinical problem viz., inability in achieving operational efficiency. This was seen to either contribute to or mitigate the healthy growth of the hospital.

Cobblestones Consulting was invited to join the management team of the hospital for a specified period, with this mandate.

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THE COBBLESTONES WAY

The first thing we did upon joining was not take the diagnosis of the problem as given. Rather than work in the management mandated areas of quality, flexibility, delivery and cost control in the hospital, Cobblestones Consulting preferred the data-led approach to problem solving.

We conducted a market research exercise within the hospital, with both clinical and non-clinical staff, that threw up interesting statistics. 60% of the 352 representative respondents in our random sample ranked patient experience as a top priority for the hospital. Survey respondents also listed purposeful leadership and strong culture as the top factors in achieving positive patient experience.

Gap Analysis

To help the hospital administrators run the system judiciously, it was essential for us to find out the probable areas in the hospital’s operations where more attention was required so that the organization could become more dynamic.

The main roadblock between the present situation and the projected future for the hospital was the breakdown of operational processes in the hospital.

The reason?

  1. Staff was not comfortable operating computers.
  2. Computer stations were not synced fully with each other.

Something this elementary was causing bottlenecks to occur & backlogs to form in crucial areas. Surgical schedules were affected, upsetting patient flow from the emergency department, and causing ambulance diversions because of overcrowding.

Overhauling the long accepted operational practices in the hospital was not going to be easy, but it was the only way this hospital could succeed in the new and challenging reimbursement climate in the India of 2018.

Process Improvement

When operational processes broke down in the hospital causing bottlenecks to occur in critical areas, these problems exhausted staffing and other resources, prevented improvements, and most importantly, compromised the patient experience. A simple assessment of the present vs/- projected condition led Cobblestones Consulting to address the first most obvious symptom of this problem – “too many avoidable patient days”.

This was because, the hospital was often deemed to be operating at “full capacity” for various reasons: Many patients were in isolation due to which second beds in semi-private rooms were unavailable; sometimes all the beds in the hospital were actually full; sometimes a patient waiting for discharge occupied a bed when there was no medical necessity — simply because it’s easier to stay in the bed than to go home that day!

What needed fixing urgently in the hospital was this mismanaged patient-bed-diseases process in the hospital. The hospital was not benefiting from having separate wings and wards with specialized equipment, where different types of patients were treated by nurses and doctors with special expertise.

Implementation

Cobblestones Consulting helped the hospital build positive patient experience into every operational process in the hospital. We did this by implementing a new strategy based on NABH standards, to positively affect the perception of patients in the hospital regarding the quality of care they received. Our operations management improvements began at the top and became a part of the strategic plans and goals shared by the entire organization. From the front desk staff who greeted patients, to the nurses and physicians, to the housekeeping staff who maintained the cleanliness of the rooms – everyone bought into processes that drove a positive patient experience.

We achieved this using a three pronged strategy built on bridging identified gaps in operational efficiency. Through knowledge sharing, training & setting quality indicators backed by a strict monitoring of the results, the desired perception of patient care became a reality in this hospital. Every patient interaction only added to the positive perception about the hospital.

Benefits To The Client

  1. 40.5% increase in patient flow in the current financial year
  2. Hospital rapidly gaining competitive advantage
  3. 10% net gain in return on investment in the hospital
  4. Reduced time consumption
  5. 38% increase in revenues in the current financial year
  6. Streamlined hospital processes
  7. Enhanced operational efficiency
  8. Refined quality of care in the hospital
  9. Organized and smooth hospital workflow
  10. Elevated scores of patient’s satisfaction for the current year (moved from a score of 3 to 8 in Customer Satisfaction and from 6 to 8 in Quality of Service)

Key Generic Takeaways

Issue 1 – Operational gaps weaken the hospital system which completely curtails productivity. This diminishes the effectiveness & efficiency of the healthcare service and adversely affects service quality & patient satisfaction.

Strategy To Remedy This Issue – Reduce the gap by communicating & circulating the SOP (Standard Operating Procedure). Provide staff regular training and set up a monitoring process to help them follow the SOP.

Issue 2 – To maintain the overall efficiency, patient care quality & cost effectiveness, it is necessary to conduct on-going process training focussed on implementing full capacity protocol in the hospital.

Strategy To Remedy This Issue – Find out the gaps in the process flow of every operation in the hospital. Perform a data-driven analysis to study the gaps and draw out a workable organizational strategic plan. Frame policies & SOP’s based on the requirements of the hospital. Implement them in the day-to-day process of the hospital system. Evaluate & compare the performance.

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  1. Is your hospital system running judiciously? Can you list the indices to measure the same?
  2. Are you aware of the probable areas where more attention is required so that your hospital becomes more dynamic?
  3. Can you list the exact obstacles causing the gap in your hospital system?

If your answer is a “NO” to even one of the three questions above, you could use our services. Our aim in the hospital assignment you just read about was to enhance the operational capabilities of quality, flexibility, delivery and cost control. We achieved this.

You could use our expertise to figure out the best strategic plan that suits your hospital. We frame “Standard Operating Procedures” based on National Standards. Further, we assist you in implementing the newly framed strategies through knowledge sharing, training & setting quality indicators. We evaluate the performance of the new strategy & compare it with the standards.

Revamping the standard procedures in your hospital is sure to enhance its operational efficiency which will yield results of high productivity.

CONTACT US

Picture Credits:

  1. Hospital Room Photo by Martha Dominguez
  2. Stethoscope Photo by Hush Naidoo
  3. Castle Ghosts Photo by  Joakim Honkasalo

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The Only Strategy That Will Work For Healthcare Businesses In India – JUGAAD a.k.a INNOVATION

BANNER

According to the independent and professional investment information and credit rating agency, ICRA Limited (ICRA), the long-term outlook for the Indian hospital sector is stable with annual revenues likely to grow at 12-14 per cent over the next five years on account of rising demand and medical tourism. The hospital industry in India stood at Rs 4 trillion (US$ 61.79 billion) in 2017 and is expected to reach Rs 8.6 trillion (US$ 132.84 billion) by 2023. India’s unorganized primary healthcare system is presently worth $30 billion and is growing at least 25 percent a year.

Apart from the size of the market, another striking fact is the hunger for innovation by entrepreneurs and patients alike. This is why multi-specialty chains and diagnostic laboratories are turning out to be game changers in this domain.

Also, unlike many restrictive Indian industries, from insurance to real estate and telecoms, there are no limits on foreign ownership in healthcare.

Healthcare Is The Most Lucrative Destination For Moneybags In India

The healthcare sector in India is all set to be the next boom area in the economy. With a growing population interested in personal health and hygiene, government efforts that prioritize health policy and spending and a significant, if underutilized, population of medical professionals, the health economy in the country is proving to be a magnet for private equity and venture capital investments. Goldman Sachs, Warburg Pincus, Sequoia Capital and the Government of Singapore Investment Corp are among investors that pumped $520 million into India’s basic healthcare industry this year, compared with $137 million in 2011, according to Thomson Reuters data.

In my previous blog posts, I’d explained how the Indian Government has emerged as a key market force, with funds focused specifically on healthcare. The national budget for the year 2018-19 has allocated funds specially for healthcare entrepreneurship and innovation. Add to this, limited grant funding, philanthropic & other public-sector funding agencies, investors of all types (high-net-worth individuals and angel investors, venture capital funds, commercial private equity funds, impact investors), initiatives like tax rebates for new businesses, incentives for investors who support early-stage organizations and a growing spate of public-private partnerships and academic institutions, it is easy to see why the medical sector in India is poised for significant bolstering.

Why Is It So Hard For Organised Healthcare Providers And Start-Ups Alike To Succeed In India, Inspite Of Obvious Market Potential Here?

Read the rest of this entry

PART 3 – THE CHECKLIST : For High Value Healthcare In India

You are a leader of your own healthcare organization in India. Or, you are looking at the numbers and deciding to foray into India’s dynamic and growing healthcare market. As part of your market scan, you understand only too well the pressures that rising health care costs place on individuals, employers, and the government, as you are of the unacceptable shortfalls in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the country.

Through your personal experiences in your own institution and through communication and collaboration with colleagues in others, you may have learned that better health outcomes at lower costs can be achieved through care transformation initiatives. These measures yield improved results, more satisfied patients, and organizational cultures of continuous learning.

In this last of the three part blogpost series, I have created a set of questions that you can use in the form of A Checklist for High-Value Health Care In India. My attempt is to describe, in as generic a way as possible, the foundational lessons that will be relevant to every Medical Director, CEO and Board member, and to the healthcare delivery organizations they lead.

These are central not only to your work, to date, in Indian healthcare, but also impact your ability to sustain and reinforce the system-wide transformation necessary for continuous improvement in the face of rapidly increasing pressures, demands, and market changes.

This Checklist is intended to be a living and dynamic document, and I invite both suggestions to improve its utility and reach, and inquiries from decision-makers of healthcare organizations who wish to incorporate these transformation strategies for effective, efficient, and continuously improving health care for all Indians.

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The absence of continuity of care in healthcare delivery systems is the main roadblock to sustained profitability of the organization.

  • What is our strategy for continuous improvement in the effectiveness and efficiency of care, and are we reinforcing it with every member of our organization?
  • What else can our Board and its members do to emphasize and help drive our continuous improvement efforts?
  • In what ways are our employees at every level supported and empowered to improve effectiveness, efficiency, and outcomes in their daily work?
  • What tools have we built into our processes for continuous feedback and action to improve care delivery?
  • How well is our I.T. system used to help providers streamline administrative tasks and improve the care experience and patient outcomes?
  • How well is our Electronic Health Records (EHR) aligned with Meaningful Use requirements?
  • For which of our most common and highest-cost conditions and procedures do we not yet have evidence-based care protocols? What is our strategy for filling these gaps and keeping others current?
  • Which of our care protocols are not yet integrated into provider workflows via our EHR and what is our plan to fully integrate them?
  • What procedures have we put in place for continuous monitoring of patient flow, occupancy, and staffing levels for each major service line?
  • What indices do we use to identify and eliminate unnecessary and wasteful fluctuations, variation, and inefficiencies in each element?
  • What procedures ensure optimal care transitions, both within units of the hospital and between the hospital and the community?
  • How do we assess which care setting is most cost-effective and appropriate to the patient experience and outcome?
  • How do we define the patient’s care team and ensure that each care step is delivered by the most appropriate team member?
  • What tools are being provided to our clinicians to aid in the communication of complex medical information to patients and their families?
  • How do we require and facilitate the routine engagement of patients and their families as fully-informed, active decision makers in the planning and execution of their care?
  • What is our procedure for identifying, engaging, and tailoring the management of high-risk, resource-intensive patients?
  • What resources are we dedicating to the targeting and intensive management of the health of these patients, here and in the community?
  • For which of the most common injuries and errors have we developed or adapted specific protocols to reduce their incidence, and what are the priorities ahead?
  • How are these protocols fully integrated into existing workflows, such as through prompts in our EHR?
  • How do we measure and benchmark adherence to evidence protocols, service utilization rates, and performance on quality, costs, and outcomes?
  • What are our procedures for using performance data to improve outcomes and reduce variability, costs, and waste?
  • How do we communicate clinician specific performance data back to clinicians, and how can we improve that communication?

The Checklist addresses the systems-level issues central in transitioning to a high-value healthcare system in India, one that improves outcomes while reducing costs. The Checklist’s 22 items reflect the strategies that, in my experience, have proven effective and essential to improving quality and reducing costs.

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The healthcare delivery systems today aim to reach for this low hanging objective.

They describe the foundational, infrastructure, care delivery, and feedback components of a system oriented around value, and represent basic opportunities – indeed obligations – for hospital and healthcare delivery system CEOs and Boards to improve the value of health care in their institutions.

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The healthcare delivery systems should aim to reach this profitable objective.

Taken together, this Checklist needs to be woven into the organizational strategy for improving quality and reducing cost amid a changing landscape, one that is marked by growing demand for cost-effective, quality healthcare services in India, the rapid proliferation of telemedicine, the penetration of health insurance companies, mergers and acquisitions leading to rising corporatisation in the medical industry and government schemes that are fast changing the competitive landscape.

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Featured Image Source:

https://www.imtj.com/news/16-point-agenda-position-india-preferred-medical-tourism-destination/

PART 2 – CRITICAL TRENDS IN THE HEALTH ECONOMY Government Measures That Are Shaping The Indian Healthcare Market Environment In 2018

In this second of the three part blog post series, I am describing the slew of government measures that are rapidly and permanently changing the way medicine is practiced in India. It is creating a level playing field in Indian healthcare, opening up the sector to greater domestic and international competition and forcing established players to quickly adapt to the new paradigm. At the end of this blog post, I will chart out, in terms of its profitability, the competitive intensity and, therefore, the attractiveness (or lack of it) of the changing health industry in India. This should be a valuable decision making aid for you as Medical Director, CEO or Board member of the healthcare delivery organizations you lead.

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PART 1 – THE CONTEXT : The Current Healthcare Market Environment In India

india, doctor _1In this first of the three part blog post series, I am describing the changing market conditions in Indian healthcare and outlining associated issues that you need to need to address as Medical Director, CEO or Board member of the healthcare delivery organizations you lead.

The Indian healthcare industry comprising of healthcare providers, technicians, clinicians, non clinical staff, administrators, paramedical personnel, palliative care providers, pharmacists and experts in the medical or surgical fields, is fast emerging as one of the largest economic drivers of the country, in terms of both revenue (as stated in my post yesterday) and employment generation (slated to generate over 40 million new jobs by 2020).

The healthcare industry in India is a challenging market to crack. Gargantuan in size and complex in character, with a focus that is primarily medical, remedial, palliative, complimentary and curative, it is witnessing subterranean, tectonic shifts brought about by the Government of India’s proactive prescription for a healthy society.

So what are these proactive government prescriptions?

  1. Market driven and government backed changes in patient treatment protocols and medical costs.
  2. Accessibility of low cost, quality healthcare for all Indians within a two-mile radius of their residence
  3. Technology-driven healthcare delivery, administration and support
  4. Economically feasible health insurance coverage, backed by a government guarantee, for about half of India’s population, covering the poor and the not-so-poor.
  5. A clear focus on preventive healthcare, maternal and child health and geriatric care.
  6. A thrust to push doctor’s across the country to prescribe generic medicines
  7. Popularising Swasth Bharat (Healthy India) as complimentary to the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan (Clean India Mission) and making it a citizen’s movement.
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Are you ready to compete in this market? How prepared for this is the healthcare organization you lead?

Read the rest of this entry

Indian Healthcare Is Changing. No More Silos, Only Solutions.

You are a leader of your own healthcare organization in India. Or, you are looking at the numbers and deciding to foray into India’s dynamic and growing healthcare market, worth $110 billion in 2016, and poised to grow up to $372 billion by 2022 (according to a recent report prepared by Assocham and research firm RNCOS). A market in which, the medical devices market, valued at $4 billion in 2016, is expected to touch $11 billion mark by 2022. And, the healthcare Information Technology (IT) market, currently valued at $1 billion, is most likely to grow 1.5 times by 2020.

As part of your market scan, you understand only too well the pressures that rising health care costs place on individuals, employers, and the government, as you are of the unacceptable shortfalls in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the country.

Through your personal experiences in your own institution and through communication and collaboration with colleagues in others, you may have learned that better health outcomes at lower costs can be achieved through care transformation initiatives. These measures yield improved results, more satisfied patients, and organizational cultures of continuous learning.

In a three part blog post starting tomorrow (I publish bi-weekly, every Wednesday & Sunday),  I shall endeavor to align your initiatives in the context of the big picture – the growing demand for cost-effective, quality healthcare services in India, the rapid proliferation of telemedicine, the penetration of health insurance companies, mergers and acquisitions leading to rising corporatisation in the medical industry and government schemes that are fast changing the competitive landscape.

I will present you with questions in the last part of this series, that you can use in the form of A Checklist for High-Value Health Care In India. My attempt is to describe, in as generic a way as possible, the changing nature of the Indian healthcare market, drawing on my own work experience with large hospitals (both private and PPP), multi-specialty hospitals and private practitioners and on my objective understanding of industry trends. These foundational lessons will be relevant to every Medical Director, CEO and Board member, and to the healthcare delivery organizations they lead.

These are central not only to your work, to date, in Indian healthcare, but also impact your ability to sustain and reinforce the system-wide transformation necessary for continuous improvement in the face of rapidly increasing pressures, demands, and market changes.

Please get in touch with me at cobblestonesconsulting@gmail.com, if you wish to be facilitated in incorporating the transformation strategies I will be suggesting, for effective, efficient, and continuously improving healthcare for all Indians.

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Physician, Heal Thyself!

My previous blog post was a reflection of how doctors are perceived in India these days. No longer are they seen as almost God-like healers of disease and harbingers of good health and glad tidings. They are routinely dissed, summarily replaced and often unfairly targeted by the irate Indian populace and a newsbreak-hungry media contingent. It is time to tell the doctor’s side of the story. Read the rest of this entry

Don’t Feed The Bad Wolf

My company, Cobblestones Consulting, provides hospitals and small healthcare organizations (SHCO’s) in India with non clinical solutions and services. We help clients shift the focus from the volume of services they provide—physician visits, hospitalizations, procedures, and tests—to patient outcomes achieved. We do this by working alongside the management team to align operations management to the achievement of their business objectives and facilitate the existing I.T set-up in the organization to be more user friendly and results driven. We work with our clients in three overlapping domains – Business Restructuring, Corporate Training and Market Research.

But this was not always my business focus. I am a blue chip market research professional & a national level, post graduate teacher of Marketing Strategy and Business Research, with two decades of experience. In 2013, I started my independent management consultancy firm in Pune, India, to provide businesses in India with Business Research, Marketing Strategy and Corporate Training services. We have worked with A-list national brands in both B2B and B2C domains as well as government departments and social organizations. The going was good.

In September 2016, I lost my father to medical negligence. As I was looking for the appropriate medical council to register my complaint, I was actively dissuaded from doing so by friends and family. The common perception about medical councils in India is that they favour doctors. Also, that it takes too long to get justice.

So I continued working as if all was well. But I was not at peace. When death takes your father, it doesn’t just steal that word forever. I felt as if a hole was shot straight through me, a painful constant reminder, an absence I could never fill. My life didn’t come with a manual. It came with Appa (my father).

They say the best antidote to grief is work. So in December 2016, I decided to carry out a small qualitative research study in Chennai, Delhi and Pune. Over 23 days, I conducted Depth Interviews in these cities, with 135 individuals, 15 doctors, 3 Board Trustee’s of large hospitals and 18 non-clinical health providers. I was looking to understand “The Perception Of Doctors Among Lay People”. For my own peace of mind and to understand why my father had to needlessly die. What I discovered was grim.

The growing numbers of people that dissed medical doctors for lack of empathy, for their condescending attitude in the face of distressed caregivers desperately seeking more information, was astounding. Most doctors were perceived to be experts in their own silos with a microscopic understanding of the microcosm they work on in the human body. This was a community which was perceived to possess little to no understanding of holistic health, nor the understanding of the nuances of what it means to be human. People believed doctors viewed common people, folks like you and me, as preserved tissue samples in formaldehyde jars that they dealt with in their medical schools. Or worse, like walking ATM machines. This was a species that lived in a cloistered world seeped in arrogance. Forgetting that while they were soaking in an enormous amount of pressure, India was quietly changing.

A little more diligent investigation led to unearthing the most common types of complaints against doctors. In order of magnitude these are – death due to medical negligence, lack of communication, unnecessary treatment and allegations against doctors, fake degrees, issuance of false certificates.

Rich Doctor

So what next? Something had to be done.

Who would tell the doctors that the India of today was all about I.C.E – Information. Communication. Engagement.

From the banking sector to media houses, from the commercial bourses to government ministries, in India, it is all about I.C.E. Doctors can no longer get away without explaining the nuances of their prognosis to the masses. With mobile apps like Health Tracker and web portals like WebMD and PubMed at our finger tips, we know what we need to know. And if overworked medics cannot give us a reasonable and comprehensive explanation regarding the line of treatment, they’ll get lynched.

The situation had to be remedied.

So I decided to do what I do best. I put my money where my talk was. When your parent dies at the hands of a doctor, all of what they stood for and lived by begins to fall into place. I could remain angry and bitter about my dad’s needlessly early passing, but life has taught me that the opposite of anger is not calmness. It is empathy. I was always a quick learner!

If I learnt anything from Appa (my father), it was how to be the solution. Not just a small part of it! So I took stock of the situation. In my dipstick study, I had discovered what ails the medical fraternity in India. Rather than painting the entire medical world in shades of black, I decided to use my talents to facilitate their operations.

In 2017, I decided to offer my expertise to the medical world for managing their non clinical solutions and services. Leaving the doctors free to focus on what they do best. Treating people in discomfort, pain and duress. So far, this has proved to be a win-win situation for both the medics and me.

I was able to get three large corporate hospitals, two large public hospitals and four small multi-specialty clinics as clients last year. I worked closely with them to grow their business exponentially, through developing targeted business strategies, data management competencies and operational excellence that was aligned to their overall business goals.

And in doing so I learnt more about Indian doctors and what they feel, than they care to reveal.  I had underestimated how difficult it is to work at an Indian hospital and try to maintain either sanity or compassion. That however, is a story for another post.

** Don’t feed the bad wolf. Replace your judgement with kindness and your fear with curiosity **

Image Source:

The Flying McCoys Comic Strip, May 05, 2014 on GoComics.com

QUALITY HEALTHCARE?? Really!

Quality Healthcare.

This word is such a misnomer. But how often have you heard it bandied about by providers of clinical care and solutions? Far too many times for this to even register as an anomaly, correct?

Why is this word so overused in communication by healthcare providers in India?

It reflects a rather weak understanding of patient perception. It’s just like those pesky ads that you see and smirk at! The ones shouting “FREE OFFER” or “BEST PRICES” or “SALE”.

When patients approach a healthcare provider, it is because they know they will be betting the best treatment, hopefully within their budget. Spelling it out as “QUALITY HEALTHCARE” reeks of either condescension or ignorance on the part of healthcare marketers.

In the competitive market for clinical services and solutions in India, what sells is proven competence, a consistent success rate, best in-class treatment facilities, patient-centric care and transparent billing. All else is just noise. Or like we Indians like to call it, garam hawa (hot air).

At Cobblestones Consulting, we help providers of healthcare solutions and services deliver consistently profitable and sought-after programs by following our advice E.A.R.L.Y.©. We tailor these programs around how clients consider and choose a healthcare provider.

At the most generic level, we get our clients to highlight the following in their brand communication and healthcare delivery:

E – Easily accessible healthcare facility

A – Affordable care – insurance-friendly, practical (need-based, not billing-based) and care-driven (not caregiver-driven)

R – Rigorous clinical protocol followed in every case

L – Legal in terms of compliance with norms of the government, local area corporation, statute and insurance

Y –  Yearly cost-benefit organizational review of performance, processes and people centred around patient satisfaction criteria

The key to succeeding in the healthcare market in india is simple. Keep your communication direct, keep your healthcare delivery low-cost and world-class, keep your billings transparent and don’t underestimate the native understanding and jugaad-tendency of your target audience.

Sure, you offer ‘QUALITY HEALTHCARE”. Got that. But if you need to say it out loud, then you’ve already lost the war for the client’s consideration even before you sounded out the battle cry!

Sounds like something you’d like to do for your organization?

Reach out to us.

You will be helped to move away from a supply-driven health care system organized around what physicians do and toward a patient-centered system organized around what patients need. We will help you shift the focus from the volume of services provided—physician visits, hospitalizations, procedures, and tests—to the patient outcomes achieved.  Our final goal is to help you become a leading local health care provider with a system in which services are concentrated in your health-delivery organization, in the right location with the necessary conditions to deliver high-value care.

– Priya Ramachandran, Founder & Principal Consultant


Contact:

Mugdha Gulavni Nirmal,
Partner & Consultant
mugdha.cobblestonesconsulting@gmail.com

 

Rise & Slay

Retaining customers in the digital age is literally a walk in the P.A.R.K.

Its actually that simple! 

At Cobblestones Consulting, we work with clients in fields as diverse as healthcare, B2B, nanotechnology and B2C to offer them strategy insights based on robust market research.

Our P.A.R.K. model of customer engagement helps our clients leverage their business strengths to attract-retain-monitor-measure and amplify carefully selected customer segments.

The model in a nutshell is as follows:

P.A.R.K

If you want to be a resource to your customers instead of a sales pitch, reach out to us in the comments section to this post. We’d be glad to serve  you!

**A satisfied customer is the best business strategy of all **

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